Fighting For Workers’ Rights

Since 1987, aggressive employment attorney Frank Sarro has fought for justice and fairness for workers throughout the San Francisco Bay Area. He has defeated the largest and most powerful corporations, government agencies and law firms to help employees win their rights.



Employment Discrimination

Employers are required by law to make hiring, firing, and promotion decisions based only on employees’ merits and qualifications. Employers must not favor one group of employees over another. California and federal laws strictly prohibit job discrimination based on race, color, national origin, gender, religion, sexual orientation, pregnancy, disability and other protected groups.



Wrongful Termination

Employers must not fire you because of your race, color, national origin, gender, religion, sexual orientation, pregnancy or disability. Employers must not fire you because you recently took a medical leave or complained about not getting meal or rest breaks or proper overtime pay. Employers must not fire you because you recently complained about safety violations. Employers must not fire you if you recently filed a case with the EEOC, DFEH or Labor Commissioner. Employers must not fire you if you complained about any illegal employer conduct at all – especially if you recently complained in writing to the person who decided to fire you.



Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment includes inappropriate touching, sexually charged remarks and offensive gestures. It all depends on how severe and frequent the harassment is. You cannot be fired for reporting sexual harassment but many employees are afraid to confront their harassers or tell their bosses. However, you can consult confidentially with attorney Frank Sarro and be assured that he will handle your case with dignity and discretion.



Wage & Hour Violations

If you are paid by the hour, your employer is legally required to allow you to take duty-free rest and meal breaks. You must be given a meal break of at least one half hour after working five consecutive hours. You must be given a rest break for ten minutes during each four hours of work. You must be paid overtime for working more than eight hours a day or 40 hours per week. Many employers, including restaurants, routinely violate the law. The law says you cannot be fired for complaining about not getting meal or rest breaks or proper overtime pay.



Severance Agreements

Depending on your negotiating leverage with your employer, you may be able to obtain a severance payment in exchange for your promise not to sue your employer. Even though severance payments are not required by law they are often given to generate good will and prevent future lawsuits. Such agreements may include promises not to contest unemployment benefits and to provide good recommendations to prospective employers.



Everything Else

Employees know when they are being treated unfairly or unjustly. If you believe your employer is breaking the law, a confidential consultation with a trusted attorney is the best way to determine your rights and remedies.

For a free consultation, call Frank Sarro now.